Name That Part – Microsoft Edition

Personally, I think engineerd is the PC guy from the commercials. (Image source: Gadgetspace.com)

Personally, I think engineerd is the PC guy from the commercials. (Image source: Gadgetspace.com)


In Monday’s Name That Part, we gave you a random chunk of metal. With a bit of guessing and supposition, Zed71 came up with the closest answer to correct; it was, in fact, a Chrysler starter motor, specifically for one of the Mitsubishi engines they borrowed. From there, it has taken a bit of work, but I’m reasonably certain that it belonged to the 3.0L V6 that powered everything from minivans to LeBarons to the Dodge Stealth. That said, engineerd deserves a shout-out as well for a hilarious guess. As usual, he was horribly wrong, but the guess itself was well worth it.
On to today’s Name That Part!
Microsoft is currently in the midst of a foaming-at-the-mouth ad campaign, trying to get us all excited about the upcoming release of Windows 7. Initial advertising focused around telling us that this new release was new, redesigned, improved, and so on. All the buzz-words that usually accompany any new product’s release. Unfortunately, that wasn’t strictly true. Windows 7, in fact, is a re-skinning of the Windows Vista architecture. In a tacit acknowledgment of the error-prone nature of previous releases, advertising claimed that they had fixed all the problems and conflicts Windows users were used to fighting with. In fact, most of those problems were simply solved by the peripheral manufacturers, who had updated their drivers for better Vista compatibility. Windows 7 simply used the same drivers as Vista.
Their next ad campaign was an attempt to reclaim the “PC” title that had been so effectively badmouthed by Apple’s “I’m a Mac” ad campaign. Their “I’m a PC” campaign proudly claimed that PC’s were just as versatile as a Mac, just as compatible, just as easy to use, and a whole lot cheaper. Unfortunately for Microsoft, many of the claims in their ads were either false, misleading, or overstated. Rather than keeping their claims simple, they insisted on making grandiose claims; one ad appeared to claim that a 6-year-old could make a professional-looking home movie in the 20 seconds of the ad. The most recent series of ads have their spokespeople listing a feature they wanted in Windows 7, and then claiming responsibility for coming up with the idea. While obviously tongue-in-cheek, they neither inspire enough controversy to be memorable, nor make their claims amusing enough to warrant parody.
And yet, somehow, despite all these flaws and foibles, Windows remains the single most popular operating system on the planet; and with virtually no uncertainty, Microsoft can be well assured that this new release of Windows will surely be a massive success on a level that virtually every other company out there can only dream of.
What does all this have to do with today’s Name That Part? Well, it’s simple. Like Microsoft, we like hitting you over the head with the blatantly obvious!
Microsoft has decided to try a new technique for their driver installs. Make them bigger, and make them out of metal.

Microsoft has decided to try a new technique for their driver installs. Make them bigger, and make them out of metal.

By |2009-12-16T12:25:14+00:00December 16th, 2009|Name That Part|0 Comments

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