Quantcast

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: Factory CB Radios

EH-CB-Radio

Some automotive options date themselves to a particular period of time, and in-car audio/entertainment is probably among the most dated type of feature. Quadrophonic stereo, in-dash phonograph players, Apple 30-pin iPod docks, and 8-track players all came from that day, back in the day.

But the factory-installed citizens’ band radio has to recall the most specifically defined era. There is something so Late Malaise Era about them that they determine a vehicle’s age more accurately than carbon dating.

So, that’s your challenge for this Monday: name all the cars that were offered with a CB transmitter as a factory option. Bonus points for anything not domestic North American, or actually finding one that was standard equipment, if there was such a thing.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • Passenger cars and light trucks only. No big rigs or commercial cargo vehicles.
  • The CB doesn’t have to be a standard feature, just a factory option from the OEM. Dealer-installed options are permissible if they either a) have the OE’s brand imprinted on the radio, or b) were advertised as an option in factory sales lit or press releases.
  • Obviously, aftermarket add-ons and custom cars are intrinsically excluded in the question itself.

Difficulty: Over age 35: 2–3. Under age 35: 8+

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: Automatically Folding Mirrors

DSC05479-702pxcropped

The time has come again to pen a new entry into the solar system’s most authoritative, accumulative, crowsourced cyber-pedia of automotive trivia! Some weeks, I think of a stupendous (read: “reasonably acceptable”) topic days in advance. Chief Blooger Glucker likes me these weeks. Other weeks, like this one, Sunday afternoon arrives and I’ve still not thought of the following day’s Hoonatic topic.

On these occasions, my dear wife kindly helps me brainstorm ideas, even though she is not reeeeally a “car person.” It is her opinion that I am too tough and obscure in the challenges I toss out on the virtual table. She believes there are plenty of people somewhat like her; folks who would love the fun of contributing, but who perhaps don’t possess the endlessly deep historical brainiosity of a Prof. Harrell or Mr. Emslie. At least once in a while, says she, I should throw these saps a bone facilitate an opportunity for more readers to participate.

Therefore, today I’m going with a suggestion that might be more fun for folks whose automotive knowledge centers around contemporary cars. You (the corporate “you,” that is) are tasked with creating a comprehensive list of cars with automatically retracting side rear view mirrors (SRVMs). The big side mirrors cars have nowadays are great while driving, but these elephant-ear projections — yours and other motorists’ — can be easily damaged and complicate parking or pulling into narrow garages. Having them automatically fold shut when the car is locked or the transmission is put in park is a nice, if not totally necessary, convenience. The feature hasn’t been around that long, but is increasingly common on large SUVs, as well as making inroads in the luxury sedan and even mid-level sedan segments.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • There are a number of cars that have electrically retractable SRVMs that are manually activated with a switch. These are dirty scum and we spit on them. (Okay, no, they’re not, and we don’t. That’s a fine feature, but they still don’t belong in the list today.)
  • The all-important airplane caveat: YES, airplanes are definitely allowed today, only because I will be very, very impressed if anybody can name an aircraft that 1) has retractable side mirrors of any type and 2) a remote lock fob.
  • Factory concepts are okay, but aftermarket add-ons and custom cars are not.

Difficulty: A soft lob straight over the plate on a 3–0 count.

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: External Hood Latches

EH-ext-hood-latches
Today, nearly all light passenger vehicles have the hood release inside the car, and for several decades before that, the hood release was typically cleverly hidden inside the grille opening. But not always. If you go back in time far enough, autos had hoods secured with leather belts, or further still, no engine enclosure at all. Along the way, a few designers (or perhaps design teams) have put the hood release right out in the open, affixed right to the car body. These, my friends, are the fodder for our encyclopedia entry today.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • As I said, go back far enough and nearly every hood had an external release. So let’s stick with post-war (’48 and later) designs.
  • Passenger cars and light trucks only. No tractor-trailors, big cargo haulers, military vehicles, or airplanes. Or airplanes. No airplanes, either.
  • Stock, regular production cars only. No customs, concepts, or race cars.

Difficulty: Low hanging fruit is your friend today. Don’t wait; act now!

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Sources: &

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: Offset Engines

EH-offsetengines

Engineeers tend to build symmetrical vehicles, unless dealing with uneven forces (think oval track racer) or you’re . That means car engines tend to be placed as close as practical to the vehicle centerline. But sometimes, unique design parameters or a strong case of whimsy result in cars that have their powertrain obviously and intentionally located to one side of the vehicle. Your task today is to name all that you can think of.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • Engine means engine: offset transfer cases, differentials and passenger compartments are nice, but they don’t mean a thing if the engine is still in the middle.
  • The inverse is also true. It is very common for transverse FWD (and R/R) engines to be offset to one side, but only to make room for the transaxle, so that the whole lump of engine and driveline stuff can fit neatly between the shock towers. Doesn’t count, Bubbie.
  • Minor misalignment doesn’t count: “The V10 version of the second-gen Saffron PDX120i had the engine 16mm to the left to clear the steering rack.” We don’t care, Captain Formality.
  • Any number of wheels (or tracks) is allowed, but let’s limit this to land vehicles: no boats, planes or underground boring machines (but you probably weren’t going to go with that last one anyway).
  • In the case of multi-engine vehicles, any one offset engine counts.

Difficulty: You can probably think of one, but it may take a while; just expand your thinking. It’s an all-skate think!

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Thoughts On The Cars Of SEMA

Peter Tanshanomi November 16, 2015 Featured, SEMA

IMG_0256

Context is everything. As any artist, architect or museum curator will tell you, the surrounding environment colors our perception of things. A screaming, fuzzed-out guitar solo that sounds so great in concert would be annoying and intrusive in an oyster bar. A woman’s outfit that is considered risqué at a backyard barbecue might be utterly unremarkable on the runways of Fashion Week, and downright matronly at the beach. The where and who matters as much as the what. And nowhere is that more true than when scoping out the cars at SEMA, the 600-pound gorilla of automotive industry trade shows.

… Continue Reading

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: Tandem Seating

Top-gear-carver-tandem

Casey Kasem memorably pitched the seating arrangement in the Ford EXP as, “Two — as in he and she, you and me.” Of course, the romantic insinuation was that “he” and “she” could hold hands, rub shoulders and whisper sweet nothings between them in cozy side-by-side seats, since that’s the arrangement of nearly every two-seat car. But what if you instead have a relationship more like , short on romance and long on gender-appropriate bromanship with a mutual desire to flip off Mig pilots and never leave your wingman? You would then, of course, need a car with tandem seats. Tandem seating, for those of you who have never visited a warbird museum, places the second occupant in a seat directly behind the front. I have always found tandem-seat vehicles interesting, and I’m surprised they’re not more widely produced. What tandem seating gives up the way of the passenger’s forward visibility it gains in smaller frontal area and the ability to place the driver at the center-line of the vehicle.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • No motorcycles, ATVs or PWCs. It has to have proper automotive seats. Although, I suppose someone clever could mention the . Oh, wait, I just did.
  • Though “tandem” technically means two, three or more inline seats is still fair game. In fact, that would get you major bonus points.
  • Though we often restrict these entries to production cars, concept, show and race cars are allowed today.

Difficulty: Eh.

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

What Living With An Electric E30 Conversion Is Really Like

IMG_0747

Currently, you can walk into numerous dealers and buy a truly refined, sophisticated all-electric production car (or walk into a Mitsubishi dealer and buy a rather lame one). But go back further than about 5 years, and owning an electric car meant building one. Or, more accurately, converting one.

John Hansen didn’t convert this 1986 BMW 325ES to electric power, but he has been using it to commute approximately 10,000 miles annually since he bought it almost 2½ years ago, and his experiences with the car are very insightful. Old cars have their challenges. Home-built cars have challenges, too. And all-electric cars have their own unique challenges. Roll them all together and you’d expect the result to be wholly impractical, but John makes this one work well enough. At least for now.

… Continue Reading

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: 2 Stroke + Front Engine + RWD

1939_dkw_sonderklasse

Two-stroke engines and front wheel drive go together like peanut butter and jelly. Rear-engined two strokes with rear-wheel drive is nearly as typical. But a two-stroke engine up front with rear-wheel drive? Those two go together like cotton candy and hollandaise sauce. They are also the topic of today’s entry in our virtual library of vehicular trivia.

As rare and idiosyncratic as they are, two-stroke-powered cars as a group are still more like each other than different. One characteristic they almost all share is having the engine perched over the drive wheels. Since they also tend to be compact, lightweight cars, choosing either the or configuration made intuitive sense to maximize interior room, facilitate economic manufacture and improve traction.

I like to think myself at least a Google-Fu shodan, but in my deep dive, the only 2-strokes I was able to identify were DKWs built in Spandau prior to World War II (1928 Typ P to the 1940 Sonderklasse). But I am confident the learned readers of Redusernab can identify more, perhaps even a of them.

Difficulty: WARNING! May exceed 8.6 GAEPER (Green Acres Episodes Pain Equivalency Rating)

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: All-Mechanical Fuel Injection

1024px-1959_Chevrolet_Corvette_C1_V8_283_cui_Fuel_Injection

A couple of co-workers and I were discussing vintage Corvettes, when talk turned to the ’57 Fuelie, and how troublesome it was, or wasn’t, depending on whose opinion you listened to. Then a member of the group asked what other production cars had all-mechanical fuel injection. The question caught each of us, all pretty deeply invested car geeks, by surprise. The ’58 Mopar system wasn’t all-mechanical, as it had an ECU—analog, not digital, but still electronic. The same was true for even the earliest production Bosch systems. All the way back at first K-Jetronic, there was a reason why “-tronic” was part of the name. Hilborn and other constant-flow fuel-injection systems are rarely seen on the street, and certainly never installed on a production road car.

Using the presence or lack of an electronic control unit/black box as the dividing line between the terms “mechanical” and “electronic” systems, has there ever been any other production car (gasoline/petrol, not diesel of course) that was equipped with purely mechanical fuel injection hardware?

Difficulty: This might be a very short entry.

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

Encyclopedia Hoonatica: Model Names Spanning Six or More Platforms

EH-six-platforms

An acquaintance of mine who is a militant Ford fanboi was recently explaining to a few non-car-guy friends what makes the Mustang (in his opinion) so special. One of his talking points was the fact that six different platforms have worn the Mustang name, a feat he described as “unmatched.” I chose not to call him out debate the facts in front of his friends, but this is plainly hogwash. There have been plenty of other model nameplates that have been affixed to six different platforms—and more. Today, your Hoonatican task is to compile them all and help me demonstrate just how long a list it actually is.

The Caveats (there are always caveats):

  • Let’s stick with cars manufactured after 1960. Auto historians usually point to the early ’60s as the dawn of “platform sharing,” naming the Mustang/Falcon and the Special/F-85/Tempest triplets as the real harbingers of that design methodology, even though nobody had yet begun naming platforms.
  • A platform is generally defined as including the floorpan, the front and rear suspension, and the steering hardware. A mid-cycle styling refresh is not a new platform. New means NEW.
  • Likewise, we’re talking platforms, not generations. Sometimes cars can be widely considered a new “generation,” but have only styling and interior changes on the same old body structure and running gear.
  • Conversely, new mechanicals do constitute a new platform even if the manufacturer doesn’t want it to. For example, GM’s FWD full-size sedans were migrated in MY 2000 from the H-Body platform to what was undeniably the existing (Old Aurora) G-Body platform. Yet, they continued to call these cars H-Bodies for some coked-up, maddening, only-makes-sense-in-Detroit reason nobody can quite remember.
  • Some long-lived cars from smaller factories just sort of morphed little by little, in a series of ongoing alterations rather than wholesale revision, until it was a fundementally different car. At what point these became new platforms is debatable. Therefore, please feel free to post them — hopefully with arbitrary and dogmatic statements — and let the debate begin!
  • “Model name” means just that; trim levels, sub-brands, ad slogans, unofficial nicknames, race cars, etc. don’t count. For example, the Cutlass Calais and Cutlass Ciera were clearly two different models, even though Olds went a little crazy with Cutlass prefix for a while there.

Difficulty: One word: Wikipedia.

How This Works: Read the comments first and don’t post duplicates! Bonus points for adding photos. Remember, you can simply paste in the raw image URL now, thanks to the magic of Disqus.

Image Source:

www.yarema.ua

www.eurobud.com.ua

www.bestseller-sales.com/best-sellers-movies/sports/