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V.I.S.I.T. – Lamborghini Countach LP500 S

This summer’s trip took me to Rome and Tuscany. For those that don’t know that is in Italy, where the cities are old and everything is pretty. For just one day I ditched my family and took a trip to Bologna. For those that don’t know, Bologna is famous for their pastas and meats, which were amazing. But Bologna is also the home of two most iconic names in the automotive world – Ferrari and Lamborghini. 

I have visited the two Ferrari museums, the Maserati factory showroom, the Lamborghini museum, and took a Lamborghini factory tour. More on that later. But I sure as heck wasn’t the only gearhead who was visiting these automotive Meccas this summer. Museum parking lots were filled with interesting cars from all over Europe. But one of them really stood out – this German-plated Lamborghini Countach LP500 S that was parked in front of the Ferrari factory store in Maranello of all places. 

This wasn’t a car show. This wasn’t cars-and-coffee. This was a store parking lot and this German-plated iconic Lambo was just casually parked in front of it as it were a rented Lancia. Just another car in the parking lot. The owner was nowhere to be seen.

Northeast United States is filled with rich bros in the latest exotics. I yawn when I see them and make a point of not checking them out. I get more satisfaction of seeing a daily driven Saab than the latest mid-engined status symbol. This was not one of those times. I was truly floored. 

My first thought was that there is no way in hell this thing was real. But Fieros were not sold in Europe. And it looked real from 100 feet away. I even squinted to check for some obvious signs of fake-ism. I saw none. In fact it looked so real that I was thinking that it was one hell of a fake. Except it wasn’t. Nothing about this car was fake and everything was real. 

The condition of this LP500 S was excellent. The interior was slightly worn, or rather had some patina present. It means it’s actually being driven. Respect. My German is rusty, or non-existent, but I’m assuming the sticker in the window say not to touch. I wanted to touch. I didn’t.

Now that I think about, I saw this awesomeness at the end of the day, after all the museums. It was probably the 200th Lambo I saw that day. Perhaps that’s why I only got four crappy pics of it. Had it been any other day I would have probably taken several dozen. 

I did a google search on this Bavarian plated car. It seemed to have been spotted in many places around Germany, Austria, and Italy. That is amazing. There is a hero out there who drives this old Lambo around the best roads in the world. And even if he is trailer-ing it around with him on holidays and then drives it around, who cares? The car is on the road as if it’s a Corolla. And that’s the most amazing part of this spotting. 

  • neight428

    That’s the Christie Brinkley of cars. While she drove a Ferrari in Vacation, they were contemporaries when at their peak popularity and both confirmed my nascent enthusiasms. They’re both holding up extremely well too!

  • outback_ute

    Lamborghinis are cars too

    • Not really. The engines are to combust externally.

  • Maymar

    According to Google Translate, yes, “Do Not Touch”. But I wasn’t sure if that was an r or v in berühren – bitte nicht beruhven apparently translates to Please Do Not Calm Down, which also seems like an apt request here.

    • “Please don’t touch – thanks”. Nobody in Italy would understand, but they are more used to L- and F-cars in the first place I guess.

      Also: “beruhigen” – I tried Google Translate for Romanian, it turned my “here you are” to “REALLY?!?!”

  • 0A5599

    “But Bologna is also the home of two most iconic names in the automotive world”

  • Manic_King

    We were same time in Italy probably, I stayed in hotel above that official Ferrari store, got great views of factory which is behind that hedge on the right and seems very big in birdeye view. Also, this Countach is the sweet spot IMHO, the earlier green one in the museum was too plain, kinda boring.

    • Sjalabais

      Funny, I’d say the earlier ones are even more striking, with less plingplong attached to them. But they grew more and more 80s in style over time.

      • Manic_King

        I generally believe in “less is more” in design, but that green car was just strange. Even later they added way too much tacky crap, but LP400S & LP500 are the best looking Countaches IMHO.