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Kamil Kaluski June 29, 2018 Mystery Car 11 Comments

There are two kinds of people in this world: those that knew right away what last week’s mystery car was and those who haven’t had a slightest clue. Big congratulations go to the mysterious commenter , who not only knew what car it was but also the fact that it belonged to my cousin Darek. RP, you are The Person of the Moment! Congrats.

If you want to read, or re-read, the story of that Polonez, clicky here. I should also note that Darek has since sold the Polonez because he needed something that, you know, ran most of the time. And had some power. And was actually fun to drive. And that women wouldn’t be afraid of. He bought a MINI Clubman, the previous gen from current.  

Since summer is now in full swing, at least north of equator, today’s mystery car would be a sweet little toy to drive around this weekend. Make and model, or as close you can get, please. The giant among people who correctly identifies this beast will get the elusive title of The Person of the Moment! Good luck! The answer next week, same place but not necessarily same time. 

Photo credit: Peter Ciani

  • SlowJoeCrow

    The combination of BRG paint, flip top gas cap and exposed trim fasteners says early Allard J2 , call it 1951

  • caltemus

    I’m gonna say an Allard J2X with the cadillac engine

  • outback_ute

    Sounds good to me, I don’t think any English roadsters would have had two fuel fillers like that.

  • stigshift

    I’m going to say that it’s this one, The Bitch, a 1952 Allard J2X owned until recently by Bill Bauder. Holman & Moody Ford Tri-Power. The paint and light beige interior, coupled with twin forward flipping gas caps, make me pretty certain.

    • P161911

      That appears to be the right one, all of the Allards that I found only had one gas cap. But it seems that almost every Allard is unique and no two are exactly alike.

  • Zentropy

    I don’t even try on these anymore. I regret sounding like a whining American, but it seems that most of the Mystery Car photos are from Europe-only examples. And while my tastes actually seem to lean European these days, you could post a close-up photo from any common Peugeot or Citroen from the past three decades and I’d be hard-pressed to guess even the marque. I guess I could stand to seriously expand my automotive horizon, but I thought playing Forza with my son was education enough!

    • stigshift

      If I had a son to play Forza with, I probably wouldn’t have spent three hours on a rainy Saturday trying to find the exact car in the photo. But I don’t, so I did. You, however, win. Enjoy your time together!

    • crank_case

      Even as Euro cars go, this is crazy obscure, I’ve never actually seen one in the metal, either here in Ireland or the UK, or continental Europe, not even in a museum. Come to think of it, more 50s/60s British sports cars probably ended up in the US than Europe, because ye weren’t broke.

      • SlowJoeCrow

        I guess it’s a question of background knowledge, I knew roughly what an Allard was as a kid in the 70s and actually saw one in a private collection in the US, alongside a Kaiser-Darrin, a Delahaye, and an Isetta.

    • Finding something that’s won’t get solved instantly (so many American cars) or isn’t completely obscure isn’t that easy. I’m actually having a hard time with it. The good news that anyone can submit a Mystery Car contender…

      Please note that this “crazy obscure” mystery car was solved rather quickly. And like last week, someone actually knew which car it was and who it belonged to. Crazy.

      • Zentropy

        Ah, I was just half joking anyway. This one didn’t actually look too difficult, but it was obviously some early roadster, and I don’t have enough interest in them to research it. I have no doubt these are difficult to come up with, and I appreciate your efforts!