Quantcast

Home » Because it's Monday » Currently Reading:

Because it’s Monday: Let’s Vicariously Assemble a Porsche 914 Engine

Robert Emslie June 5, 2017 Because it's Monday 2 Comments


If you’re anything like me then you no doubt find engine assembly a fascinating endeavor to watch. Here we’re seeing a pretty unique effort take place, the assembly of a VolkswagenType 4 engine. A few factors make the flat-four engine design different from most others. First off, there’s the split crankcase which holds the crank and cam shaft but is separate from the bores. That requires a joint—and hence an opportunity for leaking—across the center of the sump well. There’s also the factor that the Type 4 is air-cooled, which means fins on that sump and even more on the individual cylinders that you’ll see assembled in part deux after the jump. All in all, it’s not something you see every day anymore.

Have a look at this time shifted assembly and see if anything stands out to you. Do you agree with his technique? Does the need to install the pistons after the rods have been secured at the big ends and sealed in the block freak you out? Or, just enjoy a little quiet time watching someone else do some interesting work for a change. After all, it’s Monday.

Make the jump for the next half, completing the long block.

 

Source:

  • I’ve had a bunch of air-cooled VWs and have always been amazed how little they leaked oil. Mine typically leaked from the valve cover gasket and the pushrod tubes. Always got a nice piquant of oil vapor when the heater was on.

  • “Does the need to install the pistons after the rods have been secured at the big ends and sealed in the block freak you out?”

    No, it makes me envious when thinking back on my own failed attempt to swap out a bad piston in a Corvair without pulling the engine out and apart. Thanks, GM, for making those wrist pins a press fit.